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#60619 06/24/07 08:37 AM
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When I attended a workshop by an American well-known speaker in marketing, I was told that to become an expert in any field, you need to invest 1000 hours of learning about the subject. It was claimed that this was proven by a study carried out at Harvard. I think here the assumption is that the person has no previous knowledge in a field, as this is not necessary (eg in marketing, some person development techniques, but not becoming a doctor, an civil engineer, etc). I think by expert it means that you are able to operate in a certain field at a level that the layman, who knows nothing about it, would start trusting you, hence influenced by you.

Although learning can assume different forms, reading about a subject is the most common way of acquiring knowledge. At school and college, the vast majority of the knowledge we get certified to have acquired via exams come from reading books, papers, etc. PhotoReading shows that acquisition using this technique can safe lots of time. So my question is: how much time of normal learning can be saved by using PhotoReading? Has anybody attempted to become an expert in a field using PhotoReading.

As an example, if I invest 1000 working on learning and practicing PhotoReading, would that be enough for me pass an LSC accredition test to become a PhotoReading instructor?

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Uniquesoul,

If you want to become an expert in an area. You don't need 100 of hours. You need exposure to a subject in as many forms as possible, integrate what you are learning about on many different levels and then apply your knowledge. To bluff a layman...the most important think I think is actually confidence. If you sound and act confident, they'll begin to believe you and therefore trust you. Just look at con artists... If you know the vocabulary of a chosen field you are half way there.

How much time you save learning is an individual thing. PhotoReading a book will dramatically reduce the time you spend reading and potentially learning a subject. Yet to really learn you should use all your skills and senses. If you're an expert in a field would you call yourself that? I think not...is it not for other people to call you an expert? Yes you can become very knowledgeable about a subject with PhotoReading.

If you want to become an expert at PhotoReading...use the techniques. Use the techniques on subjects that interest you on a variety of reading material.. Then before you know it, you'll use the skills naturally and you'll have amassed knowledge about areas that are interesting to you. Use...use...use..that is how to become proficient and therefore an expert at PhotoReading I think


Happy Travels

A

Drew #60621 06/25/07 09:56 PM
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There are specific steps to becoming a PhotoReading instructor. Send an email for details of the requirements for becoming an instructor.

Are you interested in becoming an expert in a specific field then you would need to do what experts do. Demonstrate your knowledge. I don't know whether 1000 hours is necessary to become an expert it's really like saying you need to do something for three years before you are recognised.

Alex

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yeah......it depends on your ability to learn as well. if you learn quickly, the # of hours will decrease.

when I was learning to switch hit in baseball most books that I read said you need to take about 30,000 - 50,000 swings on the other side of the plate to be equally capable. (or practice about 3 years). well, I've been doing it for a little under a year and am already more capable on the switch side (left). while I don't consider myself to be a particularly quick learner, some people do. it all depends on what your pace\learning abilities are imho.

if you're already a very good photoreader you are probably ready to start teaching other people how to PR. I don't think you'll need to invest your 1000 hours.

C


Moderated by  Patrick O'Neil 

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