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#67508 03/08/04 08:04 PM
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Hello everyone! I've tried finding the answer to my question in the posts below and could not help noticing that quite a few people have been wondering the same.

Could someone please tell me what I am supposed to do with the Anchorman list?

I don't know anything about peglists/traditional memory aids and the MO course seems to assume a knowledge of these. I understand that it is basically an ABC list that is more or less permanent, that it ties the letter of the alphabet to numbers, and that it is correllated with my own memory web vis a vie my own associations between the word and the letter. But why does vera stop here? I have gone through the CDs twice and have read the book through a few times and found one example of how to remember a sequence of numbers. Since she makes such a big deal of this anchor list you think she'd describe in detail how to use it with a few more examples.

Will someone please help me practice some intelligent gap management? Thanks!


#67509 03/09/04 04:04 PM
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If you look through some of the past posts, youíll read about different ways people have used the Anchorman List or ABC lists. We seem to get caught up in using the Anchor List, but we can always create a new ABC list for any subject. The Anchor List is an example, not there to confuse you, but to help you remember things more easily!

Mrs. Birkenbihl suggests in the manual that when she talks of the Anchorman list, actually any list of your choice will do. Since you use a list to anchor items in your memory web, we can refer to any list as the Anchorman List even if it is not the anchorman list of the course.

The course does not use pegs in the traditional sense, meaning that it does not give you a list to memorize, but rather encourages you to create your own list, which is the way the brain naturally remembers new information.

Mrs. Birkenbihl also gives examples in the manual of how to use the Anchorman List to remember a PIN number, a speech, or a list of anything, And realize that it is as much in the processs of creating a list that helps you remember, as it is in mentally or manually rehearsing the list afterwards.

If you have a PIN number to remember, or even a math or chemistry formula, you can use the word or phrase from your list for each number in the sequence. Make a story using the items and rehearse the story until you have it. This is simply a temporary way to remember the formula until it eventually becomes part of your knowledge. For a speech, assign a key word to each key thought. Assign the order you want them in, which will give you a digit for each number in sequence.

She gives you the Anchorman List but use it in a way that works for you. If that means creating a brand new list, then by all means do it.


#67510 03/09/04 04:17 PM
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Another great example mentioned in a few of the posts, on how to use the Anchorman List (any ABC list):

After reading a chapter of a book or text, create a list. Assign an idea to each number and / or letter to remember what you have read...you can use it learn anything.


#67511 03/09/04 05:27 PM
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Thanks for your reply. Actually, all of that is clear to me. What is not clear is exactly HOW I am supposed to use the/any anchorman list. For example, you say:

quote:
For a speech, assign a key word to each key thought. Assign the order you want them in, which will give you a digit for each number in sequence.[/B]

How exactly am I supposed to do this? Thanks!


#67512 03/10/04 06:38 AM
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Decide on the topic you will speak about. Break down your speech into the key ideas or terms that you want to address. Decide on one word that will remind you of that key idea. Depending on your learning style and preference, (are you more linguistic or do you prefer numbers in a sequence?) either attach each word to the letter or number of you anchorman list.

So, letís say you have eight key ideas you want to talk about. Decide what order you want to talk about each idea. Number them 1-8, or A-H. Then attach your idea to your already existing list. And yes, you will have to be really creative.

Letís say I want to give an introduction on yoga. I want to talk about the 8 branches or characteristics of yoga: Yama, Niyama, Asana, Pranayama, Pratyahara, Dahrana, Dyana, and Samadhi. I want to present them in that order. Now, I decide why Yama is on number one and/or the letter A. Yama is the anchor on number one because Yama sounds like Llama and a llama is missing a (one) hump. Or I could picture a llama with an anchor around its neck. Once I make that connection, when I think of number one, which I already connect with ďanchor,Ē I will think of this image and therefore think of Yama. Since I am a visual learner it is easy for me to visualize the Llama. It is silly and maybe makes no sense, and also may sound ridiculous to you, but it does work for me and thatís whatís important. And, thatís why itís difficult to give examples because what works for one person may not work for another.

So next, I connect Niyama with number two or the letter or word on B. Usually the first thing that comes to mind, however absurd, is the best to go with.

Now, I can mentally rehearse the eight items (and thus my speech) until I know it simply by visualizing the list of words or images, 1-8. The idea is that I want to remember each of the characteristics and also talk about them in a certain order. My purpose is not to memorize word-for-word my entire speech, but to remember what I am going to talk about.

I hope that helps. This is just one example and you can use the anchor list to remember grocery items, an itinerary, a meeting schedule; just be creative.


[This message has been edited by Sandy Millies (edited March 09, 2004).]


#67513 03/09/04 07:55 PM
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Thanks Sandy. That helps a lot. So, I am connecting my list of ideas/words I want to learn with numbers or letters. When I use my pre-memorized anchorman list, however, I connect the ideas/words with the anchor words and their associated numbers.

So: either I create a sort of nonce (for the occasion) ABC list (as you do above), or I use a pre-memorized anchor list; the latter is less direct, in a way (because of the intermediate pre-memorized word)...but on the other hand it gives me rich associations with those core words as well as giving me immediate number associations with which to organize ideas. Is this correct?


#67514 03/09/04 09:17 PM
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Yes, that's right. And for very complex ideas you want to remember (not necessarily to remember a speech) you can create a list with key ideas and then, create an ABC list for each of the key ideas.

#67515 03/09/04 10:01 PM
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Thanks Sandy! That helped a lot.


#67516 04/21/04 11:25 PM
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quote:
Originally posted by Sandy Millies:
Decide on the topic you will speak about. Break down your speech into the key ideas or terms that you want to address. Decide on one word that will remind you of that key idea. Depending on your learning style and preference, (are you more linguistic or do you prefer numbers in a sequence?) either attach each word to the letter or number of you anchorman list.

So, letís say you have eight key ideas you want to talk about. Decide what order you want to talk about each idea. Number them 1-8, or A-H. Then attach your idea to your already existing list. And yes, you will have to be really creative.

Letís say I want to give an introduction on yoga. I want to talk about the 8 branches or characteristics of yoga: Yama, Niyama, Asana, Pranayama, Pratyahara, Dahrana, Dyana, and Samadhi. I want to present them in that order. Now, I decide why Yama is on number one and/or the letter A. Yama is the anchor on number one because Yama sounds like Llama and a llama is missing a (one) hump. Or I could picture a llama with an anchor around its neck. Once I make that connection, when I think of number one, which I already connect with ďanchor,Ē I will think of this image and therefore think of Yama. Since I am a visual learner it is easy for me to visualize the Llama. It is silly and maybe makes no sense, and also may sound ridiculous to you, but it does work for me and thatís whatís important. And, thatís why itís difficult to give examples because what works for one person may not work for another.

So next, I connect Niyama with number two or the letter or word on B. Usually the first thing that comes to mind, however absurd, is the best to go with.

Now, I can mentally rehearse the eight items (and thus my speech) until I know it simply by visualizing the list of words or images, 1-8. The idea is that I want to remember each of the characteristics and also talk about them in a certain order. My purpose is not to memorize word-for-word my entire speech, but to remember what I am going to talk about.

I hope that helps. This is just one example and you can use the anchor list to remember grocery items, an itinerary, a meeting schedule; just be creative.


[This message has been edited by Sandy Millies (edited March 09, 2004).]


Hi, I am going through same stuff as Katzjammer. Is the anchorman list mentione on CD 3 of the set simply a basic foundation.?
I mean, your pervious messages says it's either letter or numbers. Whereas Mrs. attaches letter to corresponding numbers and then presumably to ideas trying to memorize, in my case trigger word lists.

Shall simply move to the next CD to see where mrs b is going with this.? I am trying to build an effective list in quickest time to deal with exams.


#67517 04/26/04 08:49 AM
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Remember to check the manual. Some ideas are not presented in great detail on the tapes and further ideas are given in the manaul.

For example Analograffiti is rather difficult to just explain so there isn't much information on the tape. However look in the manual you'll find more information on it.

Alex.



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