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MO vs. Imagestreaming
#67944 01/25/02 09:56 PM
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mgrego2 Offline OP
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Maybe this is a question for Paul:

MO states that we improve neuronal connections by creating ABC Lists and auxiliaries. That the gold bullion protects us from the ravages of old age and dementia. Win Wenger claims similar effects from Imagestreaming. Any thoughts on how they compare in this regard (from anyone)? Wouldn't the neuronal effects of Imagestreaming be more "random" than those of ABC Lists or auxiliaries? I'm sure it does create new connections through "pole-bridging," but since Imagestreaming is "uncontrolled" how are the benefits different?

Secondly, Dr. Wenger talks about the Marian Diamond rat experiment where she showed that rats who only observe other rats interacting in a stimulating environment experience NO brain growth. He says that only direct experience with feedback generates new brain growth. Does this contradict the Virtual Learning concept at all or are we saying that, since the brain can't tell what is imagined from reality, it really doesn't contradict. If the brain can't tell the difference, where is the feedback in the imagined learning?

Hope this isn't too off topic. Just wondering.


Re: MO vs. Imagestreaming
#67945 01/26/02 02:05 AM
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Hi,

In order to stimulate your neurons in the brain one might use Holosync meditation.
Centerpointe Research claims to have the same effect.

Another way is to use small does of Deprynol
which slows down the aging process of the brain tremendously.

Of course doing mental exercises puts your brain survival into your own hand. I had an old aunty who did a lot of cross words. Result she retained a sharp memory until she died at the age of 95.

May that is related too, she did not die of any disease but went to bed one night and did not wake up the next morning.
I mention this because for a lot of people dying a labouries, painful act.

[This message has been edited by Frodo02 (edited January 25, 2002).]


Re: MO vs. Imagestreaming
#67946 02/14/02 11:53 PM
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Thought I might offer an opinion. You could ask your question of Mrs. Birkenbihl as well.

You asked "Any thoughts on how they compare in this regard (from anyone)? Wouldn't the neuronal effects of Imagestreaming be more "random" than those of ABC Lists or auxiliaries? I'm sure it does create new connections through "pole-bridging," but since Imagestreaming is "uncontrolled" how are the benefits different?"

We believe that the anti-aging anti-alzheimer's effects of the ABC lists are a result of keeping neural pathways active. The analogy being that if a tree falls across a superhighway it will be less disruptive than if it falls across a footpath. Build neural superhighways and you also bathe the brain in the neurochemistry (master neuropeptide secretagogs) secreted by white brain cells that keep the grey matter active.

In addition, the gold bullion of autobiographical memory store can stand to be depleted even if the plaques associated with alzheimer's develop. Because you will have so much stored, you can afford to lose some.

Keep in mind that "pole bridging" is largely building connections across the corpus collosum. These connections help to hook up far regions of the brain not normally associated with conscious thinking tasks. Will that serve as anti-aging exercise? Perhaps, but maybe more because you are keeping the brain active in a problem solving mode. The ImageStreaming done for problem solving purposes may stimulate more regions than passive or uncontrolled ImageStreaming, but I don't know that.

You then asked:
"He says that only direct experience with feedback generates new brain growth. Does this contradict the Virtual Learning concept at all or are we saying that, since the brain can't tell what is imagined from reality, it really doesn't contradict. If the brain can't tell the difference, where is the feedback in the imagined learning?"

In fact it has been shown that mental image rehearsal can stimulate blood flow, muscle development, and trigger small muscle group entrainment. Far from mere passive observation of another, the person who uses Virtual Reality mental image rehearsal learning recieves an incalculable whole-body benefit.



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