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So you are not liking Tony Robbins because he has a new wife with big boobs? Is that the click in the turbine we should be checking out?

I think you are letting your underlying belief and value system get in the way of doing something constructive.






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Is it? How?

Well before the events under discussion I began seeing Tony in a different light. It was a while after I attended the Mastery seminar. During that time, several things became apparent.

After Robbins, I became curious about where he learned all that stuff and started eating up all the NLP I could get my hands on and went to a number of seminars.

Tony is good for making a big noise and getting people introduced to NLP. A lot of people graduate beyond him to other things.

As for being constructive in this conversation: take a look at Tony if you want, but there is much more and better out there.

It was interesting for me to hear from Stephen Gilligan that Milton Erickson had his reservations about Grinder and Bandler's approach. Gilligan gave NLP quite a scathing critique at the NLP Master Practitioner I attended. I found it incredibly stimulating. As a result I moved away from NLP and towards all sorts of other interesting directions.

Now I sort of balance on the fence between approaches. I see NLP as useful, but not the end all be all I used to believe it was.

*shrug*

I think pointing out some of Tony's obvious flaws might save some people the time and disappointment. Just go to the source and cut out the middle-man. I feel that this is a constructive thing.

[This message has been edited by babayada (edited January 20, 2005).]






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Babayada;

The point was that you brought Tony's personal life into the equation not that you brought up a better approach or something that would save someone time in their journey.

There are alot of musicians that I can't tolerate how they live their life but I do enjoy the music they play.

I have never read a Tony Robbins book or any of his work. I'm not being compensated for this either.

Even though there are better things, sometimes it is a graduating process for people that lays alot of ground work so that they can move onto higher levels. You wouldn't throw a first grader into a calculus class. You yourself went through a long education process to be where you are now and base it on alot of experience.

I think bringing the personal life into this was a mudslinging thing, irregardless if he is a public person.

Jeff






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Babayada;

Another thing I would like to discuss is how you treat this experience you had with Tony Robbins. You probably went there with high expectations but no real specific goals in mind. It primed the pump for you and you became thristy for more. You now have enough expeience behind you, that you could look back and see what has become a priceless tool for you, learned at Tony's retreat, and
discard the rest. This would be the wisest thing to do and not waste any more energy on what didn't work. This helps you in life and on your path of self developement.

In many ways you become a Senior Classman to advise others on how they should proceed. You can do this with a helpful attitude or you can act like a bully, I'm sure you remember some of them from high school.

When I started the self development thing I was in the Navy taking care of a boiler room 16 to 18 hours a day feeling very fatigued. A friend of mine was in Scientology and talked to me about past lives, thinking I might get a handle on things if I could remember what I was doing here I signed up in about 1975.
This led me down a path that was pretty tough but not as bad as steaming boilers for the Navy. I ended up working for L Ron Hubbard as a Commodores Messenger. I left after he "dropped his body". It was a pretty messy departure but I knew it wasn't my path.
For many years I mentally wrestled with this and really didn't have many nice things to say about it because of the way I had been treated.

It wasn't until many years later when I was into daily meditation, practicing Aikido and looking at the value of just Being that I learned the value of a Teacher. Although there was alot in that past experience that I didn't agree with, there were several gold nuggets that are still workable for me today. They survived the "Hammer Test" and for that I had to give thanks to L Ron Hubbard and what he had built. When I did this all the other stuff fell away. I do not plan on ever going back there but I take with me these few valuable lessons to build on.

Tony Robbins gave you something to inspire you to search for more and you went out and you found what you were looking for. Before you met him I'm sure you didn't have a plan, after you left you developed one. Honestly, you might want to thank him for doing that.

No one has all the answers for you. You are the one that has to put together your own mosaic of life.

All the Best (really)

Jeff






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I should think paying Tony Robbins fees is ample thanks.LOL






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quote:
Originally posted by NickR:
I should think paying Tony Robbins fees is ample thanks.LOL

Well almost every product discussed here has a price attached to it so you could really say the same thing about any other product too, you know??

But seriously, thanks for an off-beat and uninspired response to an inspiring post by jeffendr. It's contributions like that we need more of here.








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Jeff,

Point taken.







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Thank you






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Kudos Jeff, you are the man!






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I agree with the general opinion: Tony Robbins is a good motivator, but he sure doesn't know how to teach solid NLP techniques.

For true problem solving, I recommend Dr. Michael Hall and Rev. Bobby Boddenheimer, both of www.neurosemantics.com






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