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#72142 05/19/09 01:57 PM
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Hi All,

I want to get a discussion going about Daily Disciplines. I've been at it for 5 days now. I started by doing a morning Gratitude Journal before doing Jack's "Creating Your Day" meditation, then in the evening doing the "Daily Review" meditation followed by a log of successes, misalignments, realignments and ending with an uplifting thought or insight.

What I'm noticing, in general, is that I like the sense of creation and pro-activeness that comes with the practice, but it takes me more time than I'd like, at least at this early stage.

Today, I did the "Mirror Exercise". I found it quite potent, much more so than I expected (although my nervousness beforehand was certainly a clue).

How are other people doing with their Daily Disciplines? What's working? What isn't working? What are you doing differently that is working better for you? What else are you discovering?

Let's jam with this!

Stevers

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Good move, Stevers.
I too have worked at coming to terms with what I should actually be doing with the daily disciplines. In the end I transcribed Jack's advice and so have a much clearer idea of what he suggests we do.
I too love how simple things become when one sees things through the lens of successes, alignment in all its forms, experiencing my day in advance and a night time review. It catapults me to the cutting edge of life - so to speak.
Initially I felt overwhelmed as my time is so short - I already get up at 5 a.m. and I Holosync, so don't want to add hours and hours to my program.
I think the essential thing is to actually do it. Each time I actually do one of these exercises that Jack suggests, I gain huge wins. There is nothing particularly new in the disciplines, nor is it complicated, it is just that up to now I have never graduated on to actually DOING it. The task remained THEORY.
When I started to write my victory log, I became aware of just how much I was manifesting and within a short space of time. Writing a success log made all the difference. Previously I simply didn't notice how much of what I think about comes about. When I started to write it down, I got a whole new perspective on my success - I am successful already, Stevers!
What am I doing regarding daily disciplines?
1) I visualise my perfect day as I drive to work (saving time).
2) In the mornings - or at least once a day - I release (via Sedona Method) anything that is limiting me. I find this changes my perspective on everything and I enjoy it tremendously.
3) My husband and I discuss our day using the Daily Review format. Again this saves time and it brings someone else into it, making it more real.
4) I have bought a lovely book in which to log my successes - but have yet to do it systematically [a confession].
5) Mirror exercise is one of those things I have not attempted. Again it is so simple as a concept that I have just put it off. Reading about your experience of its value, I shall schedule a session asap.
In conclusion, I wholeheartedly agree that ES and its practises have made me feel pro-active and as THE CREATOR rather than a quasi-passenger in my life's affairs.
Looking forward to your continued sharing, Stevers - and others too -
Adieu
French Claire

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Good comments, French Claire and Stevers!

I believe that some programs like ES get a person very involved, if s/he is determined to get the most out of it and follows it diligently. I think this excludes using other programs, which also require constant application, as opposed to occasional one like Paraliminals, Sedona, etc. I think the big word for all of this is COMMITMENT!

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Hi there folks,
May I offer an observation and suggestion?
[permission assumed }
Observation: Getting going with a new daily discipline is a pretty big leap for most of us. And when you make it several new daily disciplines, it is even bigger! They all seem to be great ideas, and they do, indeed, feel great and help a lot when you do them. However, I have found from my experience that making a commitment to daily practice of just one new behavior can be setting myself up for failure. I have generally been keeping my life very full. Even when the new behavior is something that I will be able to multi-task into my current schedule or something that takes next to no time, it takes energy just to remember to do it. Soon I will come to a day that has extra challenges in it of one kind or another and I am bound to skip the new behavior. Then, of course, I get down on myself or see the program as something that just won't work for me because I really 'can't fit it in.'
Suggestion: Follow the 'baby step' approach to change. Choose one of the new disciplines to start with - i.e. either the mirror exercise, or the plan your day, or the review your day, or the journaling. Plan to do it at least once (or maybe twice) during the week. Celebrate your success when you do it. As you repeat it more often, and as you add other disciplines to the first one, you can have more bonus celebrations and feel better and better about yourself!
Or start with the 'baby step' of space-clearing. Make some room in your day by choosing a current behavior to let go of (at least for a while) to make room for the new one.

Personally, my first choice discipline is the mirror exercise. It can be done very quickly and it essentially does much of what the daily review does, leaving me with a wonderful positive self-affirmation. - then it motivates me to work from a task list of sorts, which gets me to set one up (plan your day) in the morning (or even the night before).
Some other pattern may work better for you. You know yourself best. I would encourage you to create a pattern that reflects the things you know about yourself - what you like doing (talking or writing), what motivates you (personal approval or others' respect), what is important to (or resonates with) you.
You may find it effective to work with a coach or an accountability partner to develop your own successful road.
Happy traveling!
Margaret Ida
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I totally agree with you as making massive changes all at once is very hard since our lives have daily challenges of different sorts. We have coped with these challenges in some form or another, even if not too successfully.

The baby step is more likely going to be successful, but I believe persistence and continuity will make the difference in the end.

I find that programs like ES and others of similar nature teach us how to live again as what we learnt along the way did not prove to be helpful. If it had been, then we would not seek personal development programs.

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Thanks French Claire, Margaret, and Unique Soul for your thoughts. Unique Soul, the persistence and continuity piece you mention is what seems to be front and center for me. Margaret, although I have always appreciated the "baby steps" philosophy, I tend to be one to "bite off more than I can chew and chew as fast as I can" - like the Paul Hogan quote from the course. In this case though, I have introduced individual daily disciplines one by one (OK, sometimes two at a time) over the past two weeks - not quite the way you define baby steps, but relatively small for me. Still I appreciate the reminder to look for ways to chunk down.


Right now, my list of Daily Disciplines looks like this:

Morning:
- Gratitude Journal followed by saying affirmations for my 6 Core Goals
- Create Your Day Meditation followed by Mind-Mapping my day on paper

Before Bed:
- Daily Review Meditation
- Mirror Exercise including successes, where I was out of alignment, recommendations for future re-alignments, and one positive inspiring thought

As I do each of these, I monitor my feelings, dowsing for a sense of resonance and engagement with what I'm doing: Am I really feeling the energy of gratitude? Am I excited/inspired to start my day? Do I feel supported by my inner coach in the Daily Review/Mirror exercise?...that kind of thing. All of this is moving me toward what Margaret calls, "creating a pattern that reflects the things you know about yourself."

The Mirror Exercise seems to be really doing it for me. I seem to integrate things better when I speak them (at least initially) than when I write them, and I am realizing that the person I most need to talk to right now is me. In the past, the approval of others had at times been a motivating force (with both positive and negative consequences) for me, but these days it's my own opinion of myself that has the most influence. It's as if I have so thoroughly internalized all those needs (for respect, for acceptance, for approval, and bottom line - for love) that the person I most need to hear from is me, face to face and eyeball to eyeball. I think I'll call it "De-constructive Narcissism"!

I have only done the exercise twice, and yet it is already crystal clear to me that this is something that I have been truly needing to galvanize these daily disciplines and to anchor my relationship to the whole ES course. What I am noticing is that in the same way I am able to see through others facades (although I have learned not to draw attention to them without the other person's permission), I am able to see through my own pretense when I look in the mirror as I give voice to appreciating what I have accomplished for the day. I am giving myself permission to both see through my own facade and, likewise, to reveal to myself what is underneath that mask and receive the appreciation and positive feedback being offered, all within the context of talking about how it went for me today. French Claire, I love that you are doing a kind of Daily Review in conversation with your husband, and I can imagine doing something like that with my partner down the road, but right now it seems the conversation needs to be between me and "the man in the mirror."

One last discipline that I've been doing the past two weeks is taking a 5 minute relaxation break at least 5 times a day. What I do is set my watch-timer for 55 minutes. When the alarm goes off, I take a break and do some form of deep relaxation (I have a number of options to choose from). Sometimes I am in the middle of doing something (like sitting in a staff meeting or cooking dinner) so it isn't always practical to drop what I'm doing, but typically I am able to do it at least 5 times a day. I am finding a marked difference in my overall disposition, to be sure, and I am also beginning to use the breaks to ask where to put my attention and intention next. My goal is to gradually foster more of a constant conversation with both my body and my inspiration, but right now I'm happy with just being less "wired" during the course of the day.

Enjoy yourselves!

Stevers

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Dear Stevers, Margaret Ida and Unique Soul,
I am getting so much out of reading this. Thank you sincerely for your sharing your experiences.

I agree absolutely with the baby steps concept. Problem is I have an inner knowing that this is what I should be doing, so I want to get right in and start doing my disciplines - I WANT CHANGE. I'm ready to change.

I found so many wonderful tools in ES that I don't know what to include and what to leave out. [I would have skipped the face-to-face mirror exercise, but have reviewed this since reading your experience, Stevers.]
I have whittled the array of possible disciplines down to these:
1) Create your ideal day meditation (I took Jack's spoken meditation down, typed it up including alterations that I want (e.g. got rid of that white light ritual and instead plugged into the energy of the universe where I draw down what I need for the day.... energy, courage, a feeling of having more time...)
2) Ensure continuous focus [a visual approach via photos, dreamboard,visual prompt cards as I believe my true self is non-verbal and accepts visions readily. This is just scattered about my house, workspaces.]
3) Lifting those downbeat vibrations - doing this via Sedona Method any time I'm in a down-state, as needed, and for two hour stints at weekends. Finding it extremely effective as I am just blowing away limitations as they arise and this rapidly changes my perceptions of what I want and how to get it. For me, not having any particular feelings equates to total peace. I love that.
4) Attitude of Gratitude - haven't worked on this yet. Just a bit now and again, recognising the good stuff when I notice it, but not a discipline of any kind yet.
5) TAKE ACTION. Now this is the biggie for me. My time is so limited. I know well what I want to do, what I should be doing, but as I am supporting the family alone (husband in education and without income).... I am trying to take some steps, but it is no where near the Five-a-Day quota. Two a week if I can. Come July I will be free of the school hum-drum (not where I want to be at all, but need the money, plus the Dept of Education are determined to keep me so keep throwing out opportunities.)
Basically I realise more than ever through ES, that ACTION must be taken.
6) Acknowledge it is working - use Success Log for this. Quick, easy and it has amazed me how successful I am at manifesting. ES works. I can create things and fast.
7) The Evening Review - a work in progress to slot it in as a discipline - do it when I can but I'm often tired. Great to do on walks with my husband.

Stevers, I like how you whittled it down to four, two a.m. and two p.m. Feels just right to me and do-able. I just love your mapping the day - nice and visual - also easy to get into details without having lists (lists just seem like so much to do before one even starts the day!). With your permission and blessing I would love to adopt that practise.

Like you, Stevers, I am taking time through the day to disconnect from everyone else's issues and reconnect with my goals. I have found the 10 minute supercharger paraliminal quite helpful for this. It feels like a rest and time out just for me AND it is short.

Enjoy today, your ideal day, and may tomorrow be perfect too.
Adieu,
French Claire

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French Claire,

It certainly appears to me that you're covering all the bases with the daily disciplines you're doing. In my book that classifies as a massive amount of attr-action. Maybe not the "rule of five" kind of action, but the way I see it, you are laying a very solid foundation for whatever actions naturally come to you to do within the time that you do have to do them. As I first got into the course, my intuition was to make getting all the daily disciplines firmly in place as habit/inclination a top priority. I agree that taking inspired action (and lots of it) is pretty darned important in this Effortless Success game, and yet, for myself, integrating those foundational disciplines stacks the odds in favor of having the taking of action be something that is both enjoyable and truly sustainable. This was something that was definitely lacking in my past attempts to "create the life of my dreams", and I am curious to see how that can be different this time around.

That said, I am also appreciating the value of tinkering with and streamlining the process, not to avoid doing the work but to find ways that work best for me in the shortest amount of time in order to free up more of the day for the kind of actions that can serve to make those dreams come true. But I first made sure to do the long version of each of Jack's recommended daily disciplines (it ended up being about a weeks worth) to get a solid sense of them, before beginning to prune and modify (despite my resistance to some of his approaches and phrasings). I imagine the forms will continue to evolve over time, as I make these practices my own.

The one area I have not been able to access fully (yet) is what you are calling "Ensuring Continuous Focus". I am consistent and verbally affirming my "Super Six" goals (I do EFT while I say and visualize them as having already happened), but I have not made a vision board, book or cards, nor have I had any success with the Clear Vision exercise (which I did today for the first time and felt a tremendous amount of fear and resistance). I have more to say about that, but I think I'll start another thread for that one.

Anyway, one of the things I am appreciating about your entries, French Claire, is that you are most definitely doing the course. Sometimes it isn't clear to me from the entries I read whether people are actually working the material, but with you there is no doubt, and I am grateful to be able to talk about the things that arise as the rubber meets the road. Thank you for playing full out!

And now its time for a little De-constructive Narcissism before I bed down for the night.

Blessings,
Stevers

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I really appreciate the great input from both of you, French Claire and Stevers. From your experience it looks like Effortless Success is a misnomer! You are putting lots of effort in applying what Jack teaches in his course. Of course, you are also reaping the rewards.

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G'day Unique Soul,

I wouldn't say Effortless Success is a misnomer - just it is chock-a-block with exercises, it is an entirely practical approach to becoming successful.

You really get to the kernel of things on this course. It may be obvious, but how do you live the life of your dreams if you aren't perfectly sure what you want? Likewise, how can you be blissful if you aren't in touch with that which gives you bliss. Much of the ES course to date has been about clarifying..... writing one's Life Purpose. Generating 101 goals and then selecting those which are key. Getting daily disciplines done.

For me, ES is a journey of "how to get to where you want to be". This is why it is sometimes exhilerating and sometimes scary. There are no excuses. ES has a tool for dealing with every stumbling block I have yet encountered. I am now using Sedona for releasing limitations, fears, old stuff that is hampering my progress....

It may sound like a lot of effort. Perhaps it is but it doesn't feel like it (to me). I can honestly say that I am enjoying the whole process more than any other course I've done in a while.

In a way I am glad that I'm not in dissonance about really wanting to have a SUCCESSFUL LIFE. You see, there are no excuses. I think Canfield knows (through personal getting down and doing it himself) all the excuses and stumbling blocks. If motivation falters, there are tools supplied to motivate. If it is a case of resistance or fear, there is a tool for that. Etc. Etc.

I feel that I have a blue print from here to exactly where I want to be. To get there, all I have to do is take the necessary steps, do my daily disciplines, loose the feelings and beliefs that stand between me and my goals.

Regarding reaping the rewards..... as Stevers says, that is material for another thread.

Thanks for the feedback guys, and Margaret too. Keep it coming!
Adieu from a beautiful, hot, sunny east of France,
French Claire

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Yes, you do need to take the necessary steps. You have gone through lots of work to get where you are now. If I have to give a label of "effortless" to a program, I would pick each of the Paraliminals, which mostly entail 30 to 60 minutes a day of effort.

I do understand that ES is an overall, very comprehensive program, but you need to do the exercises to reach your goals.

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Hello everyone,

I'm new to the forum and glad that I found these threads. I'm almost at the end of course one of ES and yesterday, I started feeling very overwhelmed at all the daily disciplines to be done every day. Each of these things "only take a couple of minutes" but put all together they takes hours. With all the meditations, yoga, exercise, affirmations, visualisations, etc. that I would like to do every day, I would have to get up very early... I have a job, a husband, two children, a household to take care of, success goals to reach etc. and am feeling totally overwhelmed by everything that needs to be done on a daily basis.

I'm kind of relieved to read that others are meeting the same kind of challenges. Although, I've found the comments in this thread helpful, I would like to read more about how others have achieved a balance between their 'daily humdrum', time for family and friends, and personal development growth..

Jacqueline

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Hi and Welcome, Jaqueline,

I think you have nailed the dilemma I was initially referring to when I launched the discussion right on the head. Adding up all these daily disciplines together, it can take hours. I DO appear to be finding an increasing degree of balance with all of the seemingly competing demands in my life, but rather than share with you how I'm doing it, my impulse is to suggest that you using the asking process to see what your own intuition has to say about the matter. For example, you might use the the Inner Wisdom meditation, substituting in a question like: "What would enable me to both streamline my daily disciplines and get even more out of them?" or "Please show me a way to bring greater balance to my life?" I find that the question can be just as important (not to mention uniquely personal) as the answer, and sometimes a certain way of phrasing the question can make all the difference in the world.

One of the things I have been appreciating about this course, unlike most other things I've done in the past, is it's emphasis on Inner Guidance. One of the core questions I am bringing to the overall process is this: "What happens in my life when I turn the reins of control over to my Inner Guidance?" or another way of expressing it: "What if I stop constantly looking to my thinking mind for answers for what to do and how to do it and see what Intuition has to say?"

Most certainly, the ES course offers some great tools, exercises, and techniques, and I am grateful for all of the energy and experimentation that has gone into their creation and presentation. At the same time, what I am seeing is that all of this appears to be aiming us toward a kind of self-empowerment where each of us may find out what truly works for us, with all of our idiosyncrasies.

Good luck and stay in touch!

Stevers

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I fully sympathise with Jacqueline and agree with Stevers' suggestion. Last weekend I attended a Ho'oponopono workshop by a world-renowned expert who came to Australia for two workshops. It was rather interesting to find out that part of the processes and choice of procedures implies using the pendulum (on here you can look up Diamond Dowsing). It is a way to tap into our inner self, inner guidance, etc. I think this could be an interesting procedure. However, how much time at the beginning of each day do you need to spend dowsing considering that for most of us a day is already preset by unmoveable tasks, like time on the job, preparing meals, doing laundry, assisting family members as needed, etc.

I am fully aware that in many cases a careful planning of the day and avoiding to waste time will free up maybe one or more hours to spend them in improving ourselves through ES or other similar courses. I understand that feeling overwhelmed is something we decide to fall into somehow. However, there are situations in which external factors influence us severely, eg getting stuck into traffic, car breakdown, brief illness in the family and many others. The choice of what to do is ultimate ours, but none of us lives in complete seclusion with the only duty to feel ourselves.

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Somewhere in the early days of ES it is explained that Effortless does not mean you don't have to work at it. I really loved that message which clarified the thought that it is effortfull when you push yourself to work on something - but effortless when you are working just as hard on something you are drawn to and love to do.
Part of what I am working on in my life right now relates to that. I am seeing myself self-sabotaging because I am not letting myself take the kind of time for myself that it takes to do these great disciplines. I still feel guilty about spending so much time on things that feel so good to me, but don't have an immediately recognizable positive result on others in my world.
More personal insights are coming as I write this. Wish me success in letting go of some old hang-ups and guilt and moving into my joy and effortless success - as I with the same for you.
May you make it a great day!
Margaret Ida

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Thank you for clarifying the meaning of Effortless.

Self-sabotaging is a major problem for most of us. I create a sound and logical plan for my day, but fail to implement it because I am drawn to less meaningful activities and avoid tasks which can be a bit emotionally draining.

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Thanks so much for your great input. My intuition urged me to write here, something I've never done (join forum discussions), and I'm glad I did listen to it. Thanks Stevers, I will do the inner Wisdom meditation and turn to my inner Guidance. You also hit the nail on the head with your reply, I must say.

It's bizarre, because it seems that your answers are answers that I already knew. Do you know what I mean? Whilst reading them, I think "That's right Jacq... you know that you're sabotaging yourself, you know that you've decided to let yourself be overwhelmed...".

I guess I need to let go of old hang-ups and guilt too, Margaret Ida. I feel guilty when I'm not doing anything towards my personal growth, but then I feel bad when I am, thinking I should be tidying up the house, doing the laundry or whatever. One thing I'm sure of though, is that every second I can play and laugh with my 2-year old, is a second well spent. Those are blissful moments.

Thank you.

Jacqueline

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Hi guys,
I am interested in the concept of self-sabotage that has been discussed above.
I too am frustrated that I don't have the time to dedicate to the very process (ES) that can get me out of this mess. Sometimes I get angry that I am so caught up in a job that I want to get out of anyway. Other times one of the Jack's lessons echoes through my mind and I realise that everything is just perfect as it is, so this IS the way it's meant to be. Swings and roundabouts, hills and valleys, freedom to grow and develop counterbalanced by the humdrum.

Regarding the daily disciplines, Jack spends his 'golden hour' doing this stuff every morning - and just 20 mins of it is ES disciplines as he exercises for 20 mins and reads for 20 mins. He then adds that even 10 mins is better than no mins.

Margaret Ida's baby steps comes to mind. Perhaps because I am involved in a learning progess it takes me much longer than 20 mins. Perhaps I will have to trust that as I get more clarity, more practise, more used to the disciplines and adapting them to my perfect use, the time involved will be significantly reduced.

While my husband and I were painting my mother's kitchen I had a whisper to play the first CD of course 3, whether I was ready for it or not. Interestingly Jack mentions exactly this problem, too many disciplines and too little time. He recommends AT A MINIMUM to do the 4 meditations for manifestation daily for at least 30 days in a row.....

...... and I haven't even got around to including that one in my growing list of daily disciplines.

Right now, rather than be overwhelmed at what 'should' be done, starting up that old self-sabotage programme,I intend to trust my own intuition as to what is right for me right now. Just as there are many paths to the top of a mountain, and numerous ways to skin a cat, there must be several approaches that will lead me to being effortless successful.

I am irritated by those actions (like teaching at school here) that are now out of alignment with my life purpose. Jack's life seems to be fairly simple (my perception) because he checks to see what is in alignment and what isn't. I am working up the trust to get out of education so I can do those goals which are aligned with where I want to be and who I am.

My breakthrough goal is outrageous and lots and lots of fun for me. Aligning with it will mean shedding a lot of old stuff that no longer serves. However as I shed the old, there will be more space for the new.

I, for one, am increasingly prepared to take the risk and jump into joy.

My husband and I have a dream house right on the shore with two magnificent sandy beaches five mins walk away, on the magnificent Ring of Kerry (Ireland) which is worth 1.5,000,000 Euros. It is like Wuthering Heights, full of character, gables and pretty big as it is a Georgian landlords residence..... We want to sell it as we no longer live in Ireland. Any ideas? The income from the house would open so many doors and stop me from having to work so many hours of the week....

Adieu from our sunny garden where the cherries are just turning red,
French Claire

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You can try some internet advertising to sell your dream house in Ireland. Try to look for internet sites which are also used by North Americans and other overseas people to buy real estate internationally. Maybe you need to focus on this goal with the Paraliminals you have since it would make your life much easier where you live now.

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Greetings All,

As I've already indicated, I'm big on the importance of asking good questions. In keeping with the overall themes of daily disciplines, overwhelm, self-sabotage, irritation, and the like, I have a question I'd like to put forth for our consideration. It goes something like this, "Of everything I am doing or could be doing, what one daily activity/discipline (that can be done in 10 minutes or less) would go the furthest toward paving my way for effortless success and empowerment in my life?"

This is my way of following up on the idea that we can use the ask-believe-receive model to find (more directly than just trial and error) what works best for us in terms of daily disciplines (or anything else, for that matter), so as to eliminate all the wasted energy that tends to get siphoned off into fear, doubt, overwhelm, and self-sabotage.

As I've said, I'm generally finding my stride with the daily disciplines I'm doing, but with what I'm reading from all of you, and what I still notice going on inside my own skull, it occurs to me that perhaps we are inadvertently making things more complicated than they need to be. I know that I have had the tendency to become entranced by my own ideas/beliefs of how difficult, complicated or effortfull life has to be. Right now I'm curious to challenge those assumptions a bit.

What I have become most interested in, of late, is discovering lynch pins that I can pull out (bringing down whatever house of card of false assumptions is making life difficult for me) and laying down cornerstones (building new forms that make life much more effortless). What I am looking for is a cornerstone daily discipline who presence in my life will make everything else flow all the more easily. I can build from there.

So,in the spirit of the Master Mind Group concept, here's what I propose: That each of us take this question (or our own variation on the same general idea) to meditation and see what shows up. I propose we do this by Wednesday of this coming week and report back by Friday.

I, hereby, commit to doing this myself, and posting whatever I find. Any other takers?

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What a magnificent idea. I'll put the question to my true self and see what answers come. This is a really exciting concept. Well done.

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I will try to provide my answer too. As a first guess, I think it meditation leading to peace of mind and unconditional forgiveness. I find that when I meditate with Holosync and add deep relaxation to it using the Silva centering exercise, I can leave out mind chatter, fears, anger, etc. Of course, I can't stay in this meditative state all the time. Maybe doing it once a day and then get into deep relaxation and meditation for like 10 mins every 3-4 hours could be one solution. Also visualization exercises will help as they can influence others.

I also believe it is a matter of how stressful the environment around you is. You need to be rather advanced in personal development to be able to detach from recurring situations which deeply affect your emotions. It is helpful to know how to protect ourselves emotionally under such conditions.

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I just felt that I might share a few things that have come into my life recently. Regarding self-sabotage: I had just come to an actual acceptance that I have been guilty of this - and started wondering what might be behind it and how I could overcome it - when a book was recommended to me about 'the one problem' that keeps a person self-sabotaging. The book is "The Big Leap" by Gay Hendricks. He discusses what he calls the Upper Limit Problem. I immediately identified with what he was saying - and made some very significant observations of when I found it occurring in my life.
Now, about the same time I started with Effortless Success, I got started with Bill Harris's Holosync - and he sent out an e-mail endorsing Bob Doyle's Boundless Living about living the Law of Attraction successfully. Which referred me to some very specific information about EFT or Emotional Freedom Techniques. I had run into the Sedona Method for releasing and hadn't found that it resonated with me - but this releasing technique is 'just what the doctor ordered' as far as I am concerned right now. I think that what I like best about it is how quickly you can do it! I suspect that truly the best things about it is that it came when I was ready for it, though. Anyway, I tried it on my feelings of inadequacy and thought I hadn't really noticed any change. Then I started thinking and writing to my kids and noticed a new feeling about what I was doing and saying. I said, "Wow! I think this really did make a difference!" Like I said, I really like how quick it is to do - and get results!
OK - last thing I was noticing and wanted to share: Time and patience. Jack tells you to do your disciplines for 30 days straight (starting your count over again if you miss one, even!) To give it a real chance to work for you. So, being aware of my occasional disconnect with time, I wrote down the things that I needed to do for 30 days, then put the numbers for the next 30 days on the back of the page - and started crossing off numbers. It now seems to me that I have been doing these things for quite a while and I should at least be getting close to seeing some results. Well, when I check my list of days, I'm really only 15 days into the required commitment. I get real impatient sometimes [read 'most of the time'] and want to jump ahead before I am really ready. It is only in my more recent years (old age, lol) that I see how this sabotages me by getting me so overwhelmed with things that 'should' be working - or that I wish were working already (faster) that I give up on the step-by-step approach that really works.
Some of my fellow forum-writers might recognize this syndrome in themselves. One of you (can't remember which right now) spoke of biting off large chunks and chewing fast. You don't know how much I relate to that - my Grandmother said that about me at least 30 years ago and I am only now beginning to learn the value of smaller bites!
However you go about things, may I wish you the creation of a great day!
Margaret Ida

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Hi Margaret,

I, too, have not resonated with the Sedona Method. I did the full course in the past, but have since found other things that work better for me. EFT is the one I most often use. I find that I am not only able to shake loose feelings showing up in the moment, I can also use the technique to uncover and hack the roots out of deep core beliefs. The only challenge that EFT presents is that its pretty hard to do on the fly when your in a situation where you can't tap acupressure points. There's where Sedona, I think, is better suited, but I've since learned a couple of things from other Learning Strategies sponsored courses that I've taken a greater liking to: One is the Effort-Free Life System Total Acceptance Process - this is from a course that a Brit named Chris (can't remember the last name at the moment) released in 2005. The other is Arnold Patent's Appreciation Exercise from Abundance For Life. Both are similar in spirit to Sedona but have difference wordings and, in my estimation, a slightly different "feel" to them. Sedona emphasizes "releasing", where you ask yourself permission to let troublesome feelings go. The other two processes encourage something more like "entering into a relationship with the energy of the feelings with an accepting/appreciating heart" which has the emotions seemingly let go themselves rather than you letting go of them. I imagine that all three techniques can lead to the same outcome, but personally, my experience is that the Sedona Method subtly reinforces the ego of the person doing the releasing, although I suspect it makes for a "nicer" ego. I have found that the other two processes have a more explicit component of surrender built in to the language of the form. Certainly, personal preference enters into it, but for my money/energy I find I get the most bang for the buck with a combination of EFT and either one of the Acceptance/Appreciation processes.

As you have pointed out, I do also think the 30+ days business can be a difference maker. That's part of my incentive for seeking ways to streamline and optimize the daily disciplines. I know that I have sufficient will power to "make" myself do something for 30+ days, when I put my mind to it, and yet, doing fewer things for a lesser amount of time (read: biting off less - it was me who spoke of being a big biter!)that excite and feed me while I'm doing them means I have to expend a whole lot less energy in the process. I'm all for stacking the odds in my favor, and I sense that turning the reins over to True Self/Intuition-based process translates to a heck of a lot less internal resistance for me to deal with in the long run.

As for the Upper Limit Problem, I think that your introduction to EFT is very auspicious, indeed.

All the Best,
Stevers

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Hi all! I'm new to this Forum and Forums in general so any etiquette breaches occur from ignorance! Please educate me if needed!

I have read this discussion and found it inspiring and interesting. It has provided me with different perspectives and for that I am grateful.

My comment is meant to share my perspective in hopes that it will add to this discussion. For me, Effortless Success is about being. Effortless Succcess is what I already am.

Does that mean I am completely content with my manifestations? At the moment, no! But it does mean that I have become aware that I have manifested the life I am living--the form, the content. I'm already great at manifesting, and so are we all. The challenge is to manifest consciously rather than unconsciously.

So the opportunity of the Daily Disciplines--Jack's suggestions, or any others, is to provide a way to be conscious of what we are manifesting and create a space for our visions to show up in.

When we learn to "be conscious" the efforting disappears. It sounds to me like all of us in this discussion are "doing" a lot already.

So my perspective on the daily disciplines is that the doing of them itself doesn't make the difference. It is the experience of who we are, our BEING, that occurs while we are conscious in the midst of our doing, where all transformation occurs.

My view of why the mirror exercise is so powerful for our friend is that he is really showing up with himself in that dialog. He is present, he is fully there. He is aware of his awareness in those dialogues and that is making a space for currently unrealized aspects of his being to now show up in his outer experience. His awareness of who he ALREADY is is transforming his experience of his life.

For our friend with children and lots of responsibilities, and not much extra time to take on more daily disciplines, those activities you are already doing can be your daily discipline if you do those things with awareness...the consciousness to bring the qualities of joy, and love, and peace and happiness (or whatever you perceive to be lacking) into those activities. You don't need more doing...your opportunity is to bring more awareness into that which you are already doing.

We think that a different job or a bigger bank account or a new relationship...all the things that we put on our vision board... will make us successful. We have a definition of success and we aren't it right here and right now.

But this is the mind, and believe me, I have one too! When I know that I am successful, right here and right now, and consciously bring into this moment the qualities that I think are lacking in my present circumstance, (which, if I can bring them weren't actually lacking at all, right?) then I will find my circumstances changing.

To sum up, I think the value of Jack's daily disciplines is to give us the opportunity to experience who we already are, and as our experience of our being transforms the content of our lives automatically transforms as well.

Does that make any sense?

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In answer to Stever's question,

"Of everything I am doing or could be doing, what one daily activity/discipline (that can be done in 10 minutes or less) would go the furthest toward paving my way for effortless success and empowerment in my life?"

my intuition gave the following response.

According to my true self: "Trust intuition. ASK my True Self which disciplines are right for me at a given time and then ACT on it. If I don't respect my intuition by acting on it, then I am not going to receive really important insights. Practise asking and doing whatever my intuition says. This will enable me to grow in the best possible way."

Enjoy your ideal days and grow abundantly.
Adieu,
French Claire

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Everything is just perfect as it is... it really helped to be reminded of that, French Claire. In the last few days, every time I started thinking about all the things that needed to be done, a voice popped in my head "It's perfect just as it is". Each time, a wave of relief swept over me. I think it's a matter of giving oneself permission to be, just be.
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French Claire,

I just finished meditating with the question: "Of everything I am now doing or could be doing, what single daily discipline (that can be done in 10 minutes or less) will go the furthest toward paving my way for effortless success?"

My answer (a bit of a surprise for me): Mind-Mapping My Day In Advance. I kinda thought it would be the Mirror Exercise or something new, but the image I got was of me looking at a road map, and when I asked if it referred to Mind-Mapping my day, I got an unequivocal "yes".

Thanks for being willing to play with me with this, and congratulations on your terrific answer!

Stevers

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Stevers,
I told you before that mapping one's day resonates well with me as I think my true self is non-verbal - so diagrams are probably exactly what I am looking for.

When you have a moment, can you describe how this looks and what you do?
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French Claire,

What I do is pretty straightforward. Basically, I go through Jack’s “Create Your Day” Meditation without the tape, highlighting the aspects of the meditation he’s outlined. When I come out of meditation I immediately make my Mind-Map, following the guidelines on page 42 of the ES Course I manual. I’m evolving my own style as I go. I’m sure you’ll do the same. Let me know how it works for you!

Stevers

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Hello Everybody,

I think I’ve reached a place where I can put more of my attention on other aspects of the program. At this point of whittled down my Daily Disciplines to only the things that really inspire me while aligning me with the Law of Attraction. They are as follows:

Morning:


- Gratitude Exercise (done in the mirror) – about 4 minutes
- Recite and Visualize Life Purpose statement and 7 core goals while doing EFT (I do this at the computer, where I have these items posted on colored “Post-it Notes” on my desktop – about 6 minutes
- Do Jack’s Create Your Day Meditation without listening to the CD. I do a shorter version that still covers all the highlights – 5 minutes.
- Mind Map my ideal day – 5 minutes
Total Time: About 20 minutes

Evening:

- Recite and Visualize Life Purpose and goals – same as morning 6 minutes
- Mirror Exercise with appreciation, feedback, suggested improvements and inspiring thought or image – about 9 minutes.
Total Time: About 15 minutes

So taken together, my entire program of Daily Disciplines take a total of 35 minutes. This is much more like it, and doesn’t feel like an imposition on the other aspects of my life. Of course, I also meditate and exercise daily, but I would elect to do that anyway.

I feel like I have laid a solid foundation of Daily Disciplines that will serve me well as I continue to build. I am guessing that my attention will now turn more to vision, guidance, and goals.

Stevers

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